ISC English -Crosing the Bar by Alfred Lord Tennyson

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22 Responses

  1. Jhilmil Das says:

    Sir can you please write the answer of the question-
    1. discuss the poem crossing the bar by Tennyson as a journey of life into death.
    Word limit- 300.
    Please write it soon. It’s very urgent.

    • Satya Prakash says:

      OK. I will try to send it by this evening.

    • Satya Prakash says:

      Edit it yourself to suit your needs.
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      Crossing the Bar by Tennyson..
      Every mortal is born to die. This is the rule of the Creator. In fact, the stroll to the grave starts the moment the child sees the light of the world. Life can be fleeting, or monotonously long. Life can be joyous, or insufferably painful. For most people, life is punctuated by triumphs and defeats, successes and failures, or suffering and joy. No matter how the journey of life is, its course is set by God, the Pilot in Tennyson’s words. It is very clear that the author has submitted himself to the ‘Pilot’ to take him through the last stages of his life. After an eventful life that brought umpteen accolades and admirers, Tennyson seems to see the end coming. He lived a ‘full’ life, won the hearts and minds of his countless readers, and left an indelible imprint in the sands of time. Now, he seems to want no more. He sees unseen dangers and uncertainties ahead, and feels powerless to negotiate his path through them. This is why, he beseeches the ‘Pilot’ to escort him to the end – the dark domain from which no one has ever returned.
      Tagore had said, “Meetings and partings is the go of the world.” Humans come and go. The void left by one departed is soon filled by a new arrival. So, grieving for the gone is futile. Tennyson wants his admirers not to moan his demise, nor mourn his passing away. That they loved him during his life time is good enough for the poet. He does not want to leave a trail of sorrow or loss in the minds of his readers.
      The only desire he professes is to leave this world smoothly, with no fanfare, or turmoil. He wants the Pilot to carry him through the shore’s tidal waters with the minimum of fear.
      For a lay human being, Tennyson outlines a profound philosophical lesson through the lines of this poem “Crossing the bar”. He sings the praise of detachment, pleads for submission to the Almighty, and the Buddhist’s penchant for shunning of worldly pleasures. It is poem that radiates goodness, wisdom, and truth.
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  2. Jhilmil Das says:

    Thank you sir for the answers.

  3. Sanskar Dugar says:

    Discuss ‘Crossing the bar’ as an elegy. (300 words) ISC

    • Satya Prakash says:

      Give me 5/6 days time.

    • Satya Prakash says:

      Crossing the Bar by Tennyson as an elegy

      Every mortal is born to die. No one has been able to defy this rule. The moment a child is born, the clock of his life span starts clicking. In the euphoria that erupts when a baby is born, this sad reality gets lost. Life can be short, or the old age can drag on painfully inflicting great hardship to the survivor. Life can be joyous, or deeply distressing. It might turn out to be a mixture of triumphs and defeats, successes and failures, or suffering and joy. No matter how the journey of life is, its course is set by God — the Pilot in Tennyson’s words. It is very clear that the author has submitted himself to the ‘Pilot’ to take him through the last stages of his life. After an eventful life that brought umpteen accolades and admirers, Tennyson seems to see the end coming. He lived a ‘full’ life, won the hearts and minds of his countless readers, and left an indelible imprint in the sands of time. Now, he seems to want no more. He sees unseen dangers and uncertainties ahead, and feels powerless to negotiate his path through them. This is why, he beseeches the ‘Pilot’ to escort him to the end – the dark domain from which no one has ever returned.
      Crossing the Bar is not a joyful poem. It is a lament, a poem that shows disgust and dismay with life. The poet rose to great heights in his life span, but it remains unclear why he became disenchanted and tired of living. It is an elegy that has philosophical undertones. Despite its sad tone, it is poem worth reading a hundred times.
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  4. The speaker’s departure from the harbour and entry into the ocean is not really a departure. It is in a way returning home. discuss with reference to the poem, ‘crossing the bar’.

  5. Yash Vardhan Goel says:

    Sir, can you please upload explanation of the ISC story “B. Wordsworth”.
    Its urgent and i would be glad if you look into this.
    Thanks.

  6. Happy Lamba says:

    Since the poem Crossing The Bar is highly allegorical, discuss the various symbols used by the poet. Please answer within twenty four hours, word limit is three hundred words.

    • Satya Prakash says:

      O.K Happy. Wait till 12 noon tomorrow.

    • Satya Prakash says:

      Since the poem ‘Crossing the Bar’ is highly allegorical, discuss the various symbols used by the poet.
      Answer …. Lord Alfred Tennyson rose to dizzy heights in the field of English literature. A man with a stern face, he had a tender, and a very sensitive and thinking mind. At the peak of his fame, he, due to some inexplicable reason, began to feel he had enough of what the world could give him, and began a regressive journey, as if he was tired, and resigned.
      Crossing the Bar blisters with allegories, and metaphysical thoughts. The sense of resignation and escapism is hard to miss in the lines from start to finish. However, the allegories makes the reader thoughtful making them to read the lines over and over again.
      Allegories in the first stanza .. The words like ‘sunset’, ‘evening star’, ‘moaning of the bar’, ‘put out to sea’ are pregnant with philosophical undertones. Used in metaphorical sense, they convey the feeling that the poet feels his life’s missions are all but over.
      Allegories in the second stanza .. ‘Tide seems asleep’, ‘too full for sound and foam’, ‘boundless deep’, ‘turns against home’ are the words and phrases that look so innocuous, but hold so much under meaning. They convey the poet’s fear of a foreboding calamity. He thinks that something awful is going to happen.
      Allegories in the third stanza .. The words ‘twilight and evening bell’, ‘after the dark’, ‘farewell’, and ‘’embark’ are words that point to the poet’s feelings about his imminent demise and departing from the world. However, he seems to be ready for it, even welcoming it with equanimity.
      Allegories of the fourth stanza … The words ‘bounce of Time and Place’, ‘flood may bear me far’, ‘Pilot’, ‘cross the bar’ are the words and phrases that have been used to convey feelings that are very much different from their literary meanings.
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